5 Questions You’ll Probably Be Asked in Your Exit Interview

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One of the main concerns of businesses today is employee retention. Turnover in the workplace can be costly for companies. They must train new people and in the meantime the workload of other employees is increased. Many times an exit interview can help business leaders to understand why an employee chose to leave. 

Although many people may feel this is the time to really vent about everything they did not like about the company, it is best to answer the questions tactfully. They may need a recommendation from this company if the position they take does not work out for them. The following questions are ones that are often asked during the exit interview. 

1. What Is The Reason For Leaving This Position?

Of course, every employer wants to know the reason an employee has decided to quit. They will want to know if there is a particular reason for resigning such as a disagreement with a co-worker or supervisor. 

They also want to know if responsibilities of the position were a factor. This can allow them to correct problems that could affect the person coming in as a replacement. No company wants to continuously have to train new employees for a position. 

2. What is the main reason for accepting a new position?

Employees who have quit to accept a position with another company will likely be asked what the deciding factor was for this choice. It may be a variety of reasons rather than just one. The pay may be much better than what they are presently making. 

The hours may not be as long or the benefits may be better. The job may offer more opportunities for moving up within the company. The major reason for this question is often to let the company know if they need to reassess certain aspects of the position. 

3. What were the most favorable and not so favorable parts of the former position?

Although the employer is looking to see what can be improved on, they are also looking at what employees like the most about their job. It may have been job duties, being part of a team, good benefits, or something else. Employers ask this question so they will know what they need to keep in place and what needs to be highlighted when advertising the position. 

4. What part or parts of the job did you dislike?

This is a chance to let the company know what was not very enjoyable about the job. Most people do not complain about things while they are still employed. Even though some companies encourage employee’s input on things they think should be changed, not all do so. 

If it was difficult to get along with a supervisor or the employee felt they did not receive the support needed, honest feedback can help the employer make changes to improve the company. 

5. Was Training Sufficient And Did The Company Supply Everything Needed For Performing The Job?

If an employee feels they did not receive proper training for the position they held, the exit interview is a good time to say so. If safety equipment or the correct tools for performing the job duties were not supplied, this should be brought up as well. 

The employer is interested in making certain that everyone is trained and has what is needed so everything goes smoothly. When this is brought to their attention, they can rectify the situation and increase productivity. 

An exit interview can provide some very valuable information that will give employers a chance to implement changes that can be beneficial. It can also help them to find the right replacement for the position being vacated.

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